Vintage Microphones

The following range of microphones can also be supplied with authentic stands, cables and connectors.

B.T.H / British Thomson Houston 
Carbon Transmitter Microphone

Circa: Early 1920's - Early 1930's


Large desk-top microphone used in the earliest days of the B.B.C for Radio broadcasting.

S.T.C / Western Electric 600A
Carbon Transmitter Microphone

Circa: Early 1920's - Early 1930's


Used in early radio broadcasting , film sound and recording studios often seen in pictures of jazz bands and orchestras of the 20's.

Western Electric 694 "VITAPHONE"
Condenser Microphone

Circa: Mid 1920's - Early 1930's


Used on the world first ever sound films or "Talkies" These mics were suspended on ropes above the studio floor.

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"Overhead" Version

Used in recording studios and lowered over the band/orchestra, also boom mounted for motion picture sound

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"B.B.C Handheld" Version

Used for news reporting during WW2, continued in use by the BBC until the late 1950's.

Similar handled versions were also used by Pathe and Movitone News, etc.

S.T.C 4017 
Western Electric 618A

Circa: Early 1930 - Late 1950's


One of the most versitile and widely used broadcast microphones of its time, from, news, radio, motion picture sound and recording studios this microphone captured it all.

It can be seen here in various guiesses for its many applications.

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"B.B.C Table Stand" Version

Taken out on O.B's before and during WW2 and can be often seen in photos and newsreel footage of Neville Chamberlain and Sir Winston Churchill

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"Clamp-On" Version

Ideal for cramped and confined spaces or for positioning the mic off-camera

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"Movietone News" Microphone badge

"Tripod" Version

Used by Pathe and Movietone news crews, lighter and easier to set up than a mic stand, useful for interveiws and annoncements or at an event where and overall sound needed to be captured such as a crowd at a parade

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"Table Stand" Version

For interviews , commentating or annoncments

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B.B.C Marconi AXBT
Broadcast Ribbon Microphone

Circa: Early 1930's - Late 1950's


Iconic microphone, recognisable the world over as a symbol of the B.B.C, often seen in publicity photographs.

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B.B.C Microphone Badge

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1930's B.B.C Cue Light

E.M.I RM1 B
Studio Ribbon Microphone

Circa: Early 1930's - Present Day


Extremely rare EMI microphone, only 3 are known to exist the other 2 are owned by Abbey Road Studios and are still used to this day for recording.

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"Overhead Boom" Version

Used for motion picture sound and in recording studios

S.T.C 4021 
Western Electric 630A

Circa: Early 1930's - Late 1960's


Another one of the most popular microphones of its time, which had mutiple uses in its different forms.

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"Handheld" Version

Used by B.B.C Radio OB's, Pathe and Movietone News for interviews

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"Caged Windsheild" Version

Used on a boom pole for location recording of motion picture sound

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"Gooseneck" Version

"Stand" Version

Used by B.B.C Radio as a talkback microphone between the studio and control room

Used by B.B.C Radio, Pathe, Movitone News and also as a public address microphone

S.T.C 4033A
Studio And Broadcast Microphone

Circa: Mid 1940's - Late 1960's


Versitle microphone and widely used in radio, film, television and the recording industry.

R.C.A 50A

Induction

Microphone

Circa: Early 1930's - Mid 1950's

"Overhead" Version

Used in radio stations for annoncing, recording studios for suspending over an orchestra or boom hung for motion picture sound

Used in radio stations for annoncing, recording studios for suspending over an orchestra or boom hung for motion picture sound

 rca_ind_on_stand

"Tripod" Version

Used by Pathe and Movietone news crews, lighter and easier to set up than a mic stand, useful for interveiws and annoncements or at an event where and overall sound needed to be captured such as a crowd at a sporting event

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"Handheld" Version

Used for Radio OB's, Pathe and Movietone News for interviews

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"Stand" Version

Ideal for interviews or annoncing

Teiwa Studio Condenser Microphone

Circa Early 1930's - Mid 1940's


Large German WW2 / Nazi era microphone, used for radio broadcasting, public address, studio recording and motion picture sound.

B.B.C Marconi Lip Microphone

Circa: Late 1930's - Mid 1950's


Handheld ribbon microphone that was used for radio O.B's in noisy enviroments such as a sporting event where the sound of the crowd needed to be cancelled out.

R.C.A Photophone
Motion Picture Overhead

Microphone

Circa: Late 1930's - Late 1940's


Ex Shepperton Studios boom microphone used for both film sound and music recording.

Vitavox

Moving Coil Microphone

Circa: Early 1940's - Mid 1950's


General purpose microphone that was a cheaper alternative to an STC 4017. Used by the B.B.C, military and goverment offices.

Melodium 42B

Broadcast Ribbon Microphone

Circa: Early 1940's - Early 1960's


During WW2 French radio stations were unable to purchase any of the high quality American broadcast microphones such as the R.C.A 44, so they designed and built their own, the Melodium proved so sucessful for radio, recording and motion picture that it was used for a for a further 20 years.

B.T.H / British Thomson Houston

Broadcast Ribbon Microphone

Circa: Mid 1940's - Late 1950's


Huge and extremely rare microphone, ex London Palladium used for public address within the theater and is of exceptional sound quality.

Gaumont & Kalee

Studio Ribbon Microphone

Circa: Late 1940's - Late 1960's


Ex Pinewood Studios Sound Dept microphone that is of exceptional sound quality, used for both film sound and music recording

Gaumont & Kalee

Studio Ribbon Microphone

Circa: Late 1940's - Late 1960's


Ex Pinewood Studios Sound Dept microphone that is of exceptional sound quality, used for both film sound and music recording

R.C.A Studio Condenser

Overhead Boom Microphone

Circa: Early 1950's - Late 1960's


Ex Pinewood Studios Sound Dept microphone that is of exceptional sound quality, used for both film sound and music recording

S.T.C 4032

Moving Coil Microphone

Circa: Mid 1950's - Late 1960's


Often seen in old Pathe and B.B.C Newsreels, these robust bakelite microphone were used for interviewing and commentating

EMI_port_2

E.M.I Portable Recorder

(often used with this mic)

S.T.C 4035

Moving Coil Microphone

Circa: Mid 1950's - Late 1960's


Small general purpose microphone that were mainly used by the B.B.C and Newsreel companies for O.B's, interviews. Also suited for public address.

S.T.C 4037 A & B

Moving Coil Microphone

Circa: Mid 1950's - Late 1970's


Handheld microphones, that were primarily designed to be used in the television industry. Can often be seen in old footage being used by News reporters and Gameshow hosts.

S.T.C / Coles 4104

Noise Cancelling Microphone

Circa: Mid 1960's - Present day


Handheld commentators microphone, for use in places with high levels of background noise such as a football match.

A modern version of this mic is still produced to this day

S.T.C 4105

Moving Coil Microphone

Circa: Mid 1950's - Mid 1970's


Small unobtrusive microphone that was used for sound reinforcement, basically it picked up everything around it and was useful for atmospherics

B.B.C. T.V Studio

Radio Microphone & Receiver

Circa: Mid 1960's - Early 1970's


Small belt-clip microphone and transmitter box that was used internally in B.B.C television studios which enabled the producer up in the gallery to talk to the crew down below on the studio floor.

Neumann U Series

Condenser Microphone

Circa: Mid 1960's - Present Day


Without a doubt one of the best vocal and recording

microphones ever made, used by every major film, television, radio and recording studio around the world.

Senheisser MKH Series

Rifle Microphones

Circa: Late 1960's - Present Day


After their release in the late 60's the MKH series of microphones were adopted worldwide as the industry standard boom microphones of the film and television industry and still are today.

More to come, please visit again soon.....

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